Amelia Earhart, the brave-heart who flew across the Atlantic

On this very day, in the year 1928, history was made as Amelia Earhart, the American Aviator became the very first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. Her desire to fly began long before, when she was an eleven year old, as she watched a plane swoop past her in close proximity. She was intrigued by the adrenaline rush she felt as she watched the plane move. It was then that she knew she wanted to fly. 

Today on the historic anniversary of her famous flight across the Atlantic, she is remembered for her will, passion for aviation, and her strong desire to become a pilot which fuelled her ambition in the years that followed. Despite the fact that it was uncommon at the time, she broke all norms that women were confined to. During her short lifetime, Amelia broke a number of records as “the women’s speed record for 100 kilometers with no load and with a load of 500 kilograms”, and was “the first woman to fly solo nonstop coast to coast; set women’s nonstop transcontinental speed record” and many others. She was well respected and loved by the American people.

On the first of June 1937, Earhart decided to become the first woman to circumnavigate the world for a second time. She embarked on a trip with her navigator Fred Noonan to Hawaii. The pair reached Lae, New Guinea, on June 29th for a refuelling stop. Little did the authorities and eagerly awaiting citizens following the conquest know that it would be the last time Amelia Earhart would be heard and seen. The very next day, the US coast guard lost contact with the flight. Amelia and Fred were never heard from again. Over the weeks that followed, massive operations were conducted and commissioned by the American President himself, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. However, the remains of the flight are unrecovered to this day.

Over the years, speculations of what really caused the untoward disappearance of Amelia’s flight have been frequently pondered upon by experts, aviators and aviation enthusiasts. Yet, now it seems increasingly likely that her disappearance will remain a mystery forever. 

Citations:

https://www.history.com/topics/exploration/amelia-earhart

https://www.ameliaearhart.com/achievements/

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